The Zine Has Hit the Streets

Volume 1 of the Learning from Lexington zine has hit the streets, folks.

How will the zine affect our “on the streets” interviews?

For a prime example of the “on the street” model of interviewing you can listen to the spring 2016 podcast Word On The Street produced by Shira Singelberg and Andy Holter… “Bring the Recs back!” “It all begins and ends with the people… it all begins and ends with us.” “There’s a lot of love here.”

Visual Arts major and graphic designer Markele Cullins did a solid job of pulling things together to feature the students research. The zine includes a selected timeline including some memorable past vendors (James and Eliza Herndon) and places (Tubbs Restaurant and Lounge) as well as how the Market has changed because of fire, development, and politics. The most useful aspect of the zine is a summary of the changes planned for Lexington Market.

Do you know about the changes planned for Lexington Market?

We have been taking the zine to the streets not only to get the word out about the potential changes… but also to listen to how people feel about those changes.

Last Wednesday’s class (Oct. 25) we took the zine to the Market to begin our field work. We had done a few interviews on the previous Monday but ran into some trouble with security about recording. Once we explained we had secured permission from Stacey Pack, we were good. So, when we saw Stacey in the Market we got some business cards, which we refer to as “get out of jail free” cards. One of the issues certain people have is with Market security. For example, how the Market “rules” do not allow people to sit down on the first floor of and people are rushed to finish their food. There’s a 30 minute time limit posted by the only seating area (located in the upper level of the arcade). Why doesn’t the market want people to sit, to linger, to enjoy and linger in the space? We have some ideas. But…

Our focus for the next few weeks will be talking to people “on the streets” as well as in offices… we are also interviewing Robert Thomas, Baltimore Public Market, Inc. executive director, this week. Markele is interviewing his grandfather about his memories of Lexington Market. To really explore an issue you have to talk to everyone possible… from the boards rooms to the streets.

If you want a zine or (even better) if you have a Lexington Market story to share, email us at baltimoretraces@gmail.com.

See y’all in the streets.

October 25 class “debrief” at Alewife

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s